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Boreholes

Our three successful boreholes at Dagati, JY and Ankumadua have now been joined by a fourth, at Esereso. Here are some photos.

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Helping the Disabled

The photographs show the opening of our latest building – a centre for the disabled of Nsuta and District. The main donors, a Swiss charity called BasAid, sent representatives to the ceremony and were very impressed by the whole project. So little is provided for the disabled in Ghana that we feel this is one of the most worthwhile things we’ve done.

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Three To A Desk

The pupils at Atonsu Primary School

Campton Lower School generously donated funds to make desks for children in Atonsu Primary School. The two schools are twinned and regularly exchange letters and messages.

Atonsu School wrote to thank Campton, saying the (absence of desks) had been a serious need, and promising to cherish and remember Campton’s sensitivity to Antonsu’s problems.

A Way Of Living

One of the Ashanti villages I visited last month was called Wonoo. Some of the community are local Ashantis, but others are settlers who came south because climate change was making it nearly impossible to scratch a living in Northern Ghana or Burkino Faso.

They told us they were from the Dagumba, Fra-Fra, Dagati, Fulanji, Gunja and Mossi tribes. They are collectively called ‘Zongos,’ and they have their own line of authority. A village Zongo Chief will report to an area Zongo chief. Not sure how far up the chain goes.

Most of the Zongos are Muslim, but some are Christian and others follow traditional religions, led by people including the guy in the bottom photo. (Sorry, can’t persuade the photos to turn the right way up.) They all live peacefully together, regardless of ethnicity or religious beliefs. Why can’t we take a leaf out of their book.


Drilling in Dagati

Last week we managed to drill three successful boreholes in Ashanti – one in Dagati, one in JY (both privately sponsored villages) and the third in Ankumadua, where we’re also building a clinic. Our success rate was 100 per cent, which is a great improvement on past efforts when at best we averaged two in three.
Apparently the improvement is because we’re using a different sort of geophysics, which depend on radar to detect puddles of water below ground. Whatever – it’s turning round the villagers’ lives.

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